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Color Reproduction

Color Reproduction

You've captured an important milestone in your client's life. Accurate color reproduction is critical to safeguarding the moment. The range of available colors within a typical scene is very diverse – from bold, bright, deep colors to soft, subtle more complex tones -- true photo paper delivers true-to-life colors that are beautifully reproduced, print after print.

Flesh Reproduction

Flesh Reproduction

Flesh tone reproduction and the flesh-to-neutral relationship are two key attributes of true photo paper. Flesh-to-neutral defines the relationship between flesh tone and the neutrality of highlights, midtones, and shadows. When balanced for pleasing flesh, the proper ratio and colors of the highlights and shadows are balanced and optimized. The result is flesh tones, highlights, and shadows looking natural without “ruddiness” or “beefiness” in the flesh, while maintaining a natural look in facial highlights.

Highlight and Shadow Detail

Highlight and Shadow Detail

Consider capturing the intricate details in a bride’s white wedding gown and the groom’s black tuxedo as he stands next to her. The special imaging characteristics of Kodak’s family of true photo papers provides a softer, lower contrast, lower scale to preserve highlight details in the wedding gown along with preserving the maximum density (D-max) of the tuxedo to enable the digital printer to reproduce subtle details in the shadow areas, in order to get the most out of an image.  The result – prints that reflect the intricate, fine-quality details of your capture.

Illuminant Insensitivity

Illuminant Insensitivity

That’s a mouthful!  In other words, how does the print hold up under a variety of lighting conditions?  Depending on the colorants used in the various digital printing technologies, sensitivity to viewing illuminants — e.g. daylight, tungsten,  fluorescent, LED, etc — can be quite high. That is, a print may have excellent color reproduction and flesh tone characteristics when viewed under daylight illumination but look quite different when viewed indoors.  This phenomenon is called “metamerism”.  The dyes used in true photo paper have minimal sensitivity to differences in viewing illumination. Prints on true photo paper look great regardless of where they are viewed — in daylight conditions at the family picnic, while relaxing in the home, even under tungsten or fluorescent conditions in a retail environment.